Dijon Vinaigrette

I love, love, love this vinaigrette!  It’s incredibly fast and easy to make and tastes amazing on any salad.  It has easily become one of our all time favorites.

Dijon Vinaigrette
Click HERE for the recipe!

Dijon Vinaigrette from UnrulyBliss.com

Dijon Vinaigrette from UnrulyBliss.com

{My current favorite salad!  Spring mix greens with red onion, pecans, goat cheese, and dried cranberries.}

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Garlic Parmesan Roasted Chickpeas

Being all fat and preggo {4 days to go!}, all I want to do is eat.  Seriously.

After spending almost an hour cooking the most delicious breakfast, I’ll sit down and start to eat it and I’ll already begin thinking about what I want to eat for lunch.  Then later, again, the same thing happens at lunch time.  All I think is, “Mmmm, lunch.  So what should we make for dinner?”  And in between meals, I find my mind wandering to what could be hiding in our cabinets that is deliciously snack worthy.  If I didn’t know for sure that there was only one baby girl in my belly, I would be so scared there was three!

So I wanted something relatively healthy on hand for snacking in between my highly anticipated meals and decided to try out these roasted chickpeas.  I’ve never had them this way before and they were fantastic!  I cut the recipe out of my April issue of Clean Eating Magazine and I’m so happy I saved it!  Another score for Clean Eating Mag.  I can’t wait to roast more chickpeas except now I want to try out so many different flavors.  I bet a little Cajun seasoning on these babies would be delish!

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Chickpeas
Click HERE for the recipe!

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Chickpeas from UnrulyBliss.com

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Chickpeas from UnrulyBliss.com

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Chickpeas from UnrulyBliss.com

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Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats

Growing up, I was never really much of a dog person.  We had this toy poodle named Ginger but she was mainly my mother’s dog.  When she passed away on the day of my sister’s wedding, I remember watching my mother and seeing how sad she was, but I didn’t really understand.  I felt bad for her, but never gave much thought to how much the small dog must have meant to her.  It wasn’t until Justin and I got Frankie {our Boston Terrier} that I ever considered what kind of bond a dog and a human can really have.  We’d been dating for only seven months when we decided to see how well we could raise a puppy together.  It was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.  Not only did I see how well Justin and I could work together, but I fell madly in love with this little creature who seemed to love me back unconditionally.

Me and FrankieWe got really lucky with him and over the last three years, Frankie has been extremely healthy {aside from a few common pup problems}.  But a few weeks ago, I noticed that he kept abruptly shaking his head and trying to scratch at his ears.  The vet informed us that Frankie most likely had an allergy to one of the treats that he eats.  My heart sank at the thought that I may have been feeding something to my precious puppy that was causing him pain or grief.  So off I went on a mission to find something that I could make for him myself!  I found this organic pumpkin “cookie” recipe that came out just perfect!  I altered the bake time so that the cookie was more chewy than hard {Frankie is annoyingly picky with his treats} and he loooooooves these things.  And I love knowing that I am only giving him the best!  So show your pup some love and bake up a batch of these bad boys.  You’ll be so happy you did.

Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats
Click HERE for the recipe!

Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats from UnrulyBliss.com

Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats from UnrulyBliss.com

Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats from UnrulyBliss.com

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An Exploration in Cheese: Part 4

Justin and I stay away from processed foods as much as we can, but sadly, I can not break up with cheese.  Never could I ever.  I love it too much.  So…because of my undying love for cheese, we try to only eat it as a treat (and in recipes that wouldn’t be the same without it).  We go grocery shopping every Sunday and over the last 5 months we have bought a new, different, small block of cheese from the under five dollar bin.  So every week, we try a new cheese.  This is part 4 in this series.  Read about our first five cheeses HERE, our second five cheeses HERE, and our third five cheeses HERE.  Enjoy!


Fontina Mauri

Fontina has been one of Italy’s most famous cheeses since the eleventh century.   It is a semi-hard, cooked curd cheese, with a reddish brown brushed rind and beige interior. The flavor is earthy and herbaceous with a hint of mushrooms and has a delicately perfumed aroma.  {info from HERE}


St. Nectaire French Cheese with Edible Rind

Saint-Nectaire is a French cheese made in the Auvergne region of central France since at least the 17th century.  Saint-Nectaire is a pressed, uncooked cheese made from cow‘s milk and it is circular in shape.  The finished cheese has a grey/brown rind, with white, yellow or red patches that surround a semi-hard pâte that is creamy in appearance with occasional residual holes.  This dense cheese has a silky texture with soft acidity and its taste has hints of hazelnut and mushrooms, due to the aromatic flora where the cheese ages.  {info from HERE}


Windsor Red

Windsor Red is a pale, firm, and moist cheddar laced with port and brandy; a combination of cheesy creaminess and subtle fruitiness.  It is made by Long Clawson Dairy in the Vale of Belvoir, an area famous for rich pastures and great cheese, including Stilton.  Windsor Red makes a great dessert cheese and naturally goes very nicely with a glass of port and some plain oat wafers or some grapes.  {info from HERE}


Goat Buche with Edible Rind

This goat’s milk cheese from Poitou in the Loire Valley is aged for two months, during which time it develops a hard, edible crust complete with a bloomy white mold coating.  It is sharp and tangy near the rind and gets progressively richer and creamier toward the center.  {info from HERE}


Menage

Menage is a cheese made from a mixture of sheep, goat and cow’s milk and is aged for intense flavor and a drier texture.  This hand-crafted cheese has a sweet, earthy flavor with a slightly sweet, tangy finish.  Menage is a gourmet cheese that won 1st Place at the 2005 American Cheese Society in its category and received a Silver award in the 2010 World Cheese Awards.  {info from HERE}

“If I had to give up cheese or chocolate, I’d give up chocolate in a heartbeat.”
– Amanda Peet

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An Exploration in Cheese: Part 3

Justin and I stay away from processed foods as much as we can, but sadly, I can not break up with cheese.  Never could I ever.  I love it too much.  So…because of my undying love for cheese, we try to only eat it as a treat (and in recipes that wouldn’t be the same without it).  We go grocery shopping every Sunday and over the last 5 months we have bought a new, different, small block of cheese from the under five dollar bin.  So every week, we try a new cheese.  This is part 3 in this series.  Read about our first five cheeses HERE and our second five cheeses HERE.  Enjoy!


Blue Castello

This brie-like blue cheese from Denmark is a distant derivative of Italian Gorgonzola but has a higher fat content and a milder flavor.  It is a perfect blue for those who like a little blue flavor without being blown away.  {info from HERE}  Blue Castello pictured in front.


 Irish Cheddar Marbled with Porter Beer

This cheese is made from pasteurized cow’s milk and is considered a vegetarian cheese because a vegetable rennet is used.  It goes without saying that a dark beer is an appropriate accompaniment.  Pebble-size curds are veined with dark-brown porter beer, creating a rich, marbled appearance.  The porter does not overwhelm the cheddar.  The fantastic looking gourmet cheese is a full-flavored and tangy cheddar with a firm texture.  {info from HERE}


Chimay Belgian Beer Cheese with Edible Rind

Chimay is a semi-soft, beer-washed cheese made in Belgium at the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Scourmont.  Once produced, the cheese is regularly washed with Chimay beer.  The cheese is made from pasteurized cow’s milk and produced in a wide, flat disk format.  It has a crusty thick rind that is bright orange and tacky to the touch.  The interior paste is a deep lemon curd yellow.  Chimay’s flavor is robust and lingers long after eating.  {info from HERE}


Montegrappa

Montegrappa is an aged cow’s milk cheese from the Veneto region of Northern Italy; the cheese takes its name from a nearby mountain.  The interior of this Italian gourmet cheese is firm, dense, cheddar-like, is somewhat dry with an ivory color and an occasional small eye.  It smells faintly of brown butter and has a really nice flavor of toasted walnuts.  Montegrappa is a great cheese to melt in a fondue or shaved over a salad.  {info from HERE}


Mammoth Cheddar

Mammoth Cheddar is a very old traditional style of cheese.  It is usually a 74 lb. wheel that is cellar cured. Native molds are grown on the surface of the cheese and then cured for 10 months.  The flavor is very fresh and delicious with some fruity afternotes.  This cheese won 3rd Place at the 2009 American Cheese Society Competition.  {info from HERE}

“Nothing says holidays…like a cheese log.”
- Ellen DeGeneres

 

 

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